Friday, December 28, 2012

Bathroom Monologue: The Original Tuesday


The meteor shower began Tuesday and ran into August. Isaiah only noticed them on his morning drive to work, with his left arm propped in the window, rolled down to enjoy the blow-by breeze. A shooting star cut his arm quite severely and he needed two band-aids once he got into the office.

Every morning the shooting stars found ways to cut Isaiah. They sliced his neck and gashed his brain. Soon he couldn’t type because of the bandage around his right hand. He wound up leaving the band-aids over his eyebrows because, even if they’d healed, the sting of removing tape from the fine hairs was too much for him.

Soon. Soon his office mates mocked his plethora of band-aids and gauze, and the special glasses needed to correct his vision after one comet collided with his eye. Some doubted his stories. No one else saw the meteor showers, but no one needs to see you cut in order for you to bleed. This, Isaiah learned.

There was a comfort to his adhesive, self-healing armor, and once Isaiah thought about it that way, he didn’t see why everyone didn’t want adhesive, self-healing armor. He replaced his socks with fresh gauze, and tailored shirts of hospital linens, and whenever he spilled something on himself he merely applied antiseptic and dressed the emergent area, and would then go back to eating his meatball sub and reading about the rites of mummification.

One Tuesday (after the original Tuesday), Isaiah removed his brain using a chopstick and a dental pick. Immediately nagging thoughts ceased to worry him. No longer was he affected by the peer pressure, or the second-guessing of his father, or by upcoming elections. Somehow it was only after pulling his amygdala out through his nose that Isaiah realized there had always been upcoming elections, and would always be upcoming elections, and no matter the result, he’d never been too satisfied with them, and so he would return to calculating obscene equations and reading about the lovers of pharaohs.

That was, no doubt, what made Isaiah remove his heart. It was easier than the brain on account of the passages between his ribs being more plentiful and generally broader than his nostrils. No sooner did he remove his heart then he found it much easier to talk around women. The ancient Egyptians did not believe the heart to be the seat of lust, but they were all dead, being ancient. This was another revelation he’d experienced since removing his brain, and he enjoyed explaining these things to the many women he met as they sheltered from meteor showers.

Women found him exceedingly clever these new Tuesdays. No other man had thought to bring a star-proof umbrella to the office, and so every lunch break he had his own personal harem clustered around him, at least until they made it to the deli. Then his harem scattered and took numbered tickets. It felt nice to be so popular.

Being so popular, Isaiah took more risks. He donated all his blood at a local drive, and several more organs for kids who needed transplants. He didn’t understand why people would want still more organs, but if so, then fine, have both of his kidneys, and both of his lungs, and all of the bone marrow you can eat, little medicinal vampires. He soon forgot why people wanted these things at all, and read long into the night of his occult texts to decipher why, and failed to decipher it, and decided their words had become deceiving because he tended to read them by the light of the meteor shower. There were no other lights these Tuesdays.

He came in second in the office footrace. He took a pottery class and sculpted himself a new face to wear over all his band-aids. One time his heel snagged on a sewer grate and his bandages unraveled until there was nothing left of him. Isaiah balled himself up and forced himself to go to work. He was out of sick days, and he thought the vampire in Accounting fancied him. He wondered if he might offer himself to wrap around her for when the months turned cold.

Then came August.

25 comments:

  1. Wha?! WHAT HAPPENED IN AUGUST?????????

    LOL, this was strange. In the good way.

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    1. Why, isn't it obvious? The meteor showers ended.

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  2. This was seriously effed up, and I mean that as a sincere compliment. The cheery tone contrasts nicely with the reader's screams of, "What? That's just WRONG. But also kinda funny."

    Awesome ending too. Somehow I'm relieved we don't know what happened in August.

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    1. Definitely the kind of comment I wanted to wake up to. Thank you very much, Katherine. I'm glad you dug it.

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  3. Gory and humourous - a great combination!

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    1. Did any particular merger of the two work for you, Gail?

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  4. weird, several of these themes are floating about in my WIP novel, though from a diametrically opposite angle. I did love the line "Then his harem scattered and took numbered tickets." That was frickin' hilarious

    marc nash

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    1. Haha, when I go this deep into The Weird, I'm never sure what humor will land. Thank you so much for pointing that bit out.

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  5. Whatever virus you were fighting while you wrote this, I hope you sent a swab off to the CDC.

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    1. At least you didn't suggest I was high...

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  6. Cool story John, can I borrow your muse for a few days... Please?

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    1. I'll let you know the very first day I'm not using her services.

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    1. Does that mean you liked it, Ms. Von Doom?

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  8. You definitely get points for weirdest Friday Flash this week...in a good way. This was cringe-worthy, but mostly because of the band-aids. I'm allergic and the thought of them all over his hands and face creeped me out. Nicely done, Sir.

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    1. Thank you kindly, my Lady. I put a lot of my heart into it.

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  9. I really like this; it is beautifully warped.

    I think in paragraph 4 you meant thought instead of through in "...and once Isaiah through about it that way...."

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  10. I kinda wonder what it feels like to be this empty and free from all heartbreaking, world shaking emotions. But then again there are no meteor showers here. And it's pretty warm in August. And it's kinda scary!

    Great story, John, I did not expect it to develop like this, but loved it nontheless.

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  11. John, this is such a great flash!
    This kind of writing reminds me of István Őrkény's "One minute stories". He was a Hungarian writer, the first to ever write flash fiction (which is probably why he called them one minute stories, lacking the ff term.) :)

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  12. John, this is awesome! I love mind-twisting stories. You've twisted and twisted very, very effectively here. I was surprised several times, and I laughed.

    Two subtle jokes I enjoyed in particular--
    - gashed his brain...couldn't type because of bandages on right hand -- as if not being able to type is worse!
    - applied antiseptic and dressed the area after spilling -- ha ha ha!

    I had a couple of comments but when I reread the lines I changed my mind. I think they work the way they are. Bravo!

    Your style is similar to mine -- mind if I tweet you when I publish a story so you can take a look?

    -- Esther

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    1. Ping me on Twitter at any time, Esther. I'm happy to chat or to see your stories. Be sure to put them out as #fridayflash, too, so more people can get a look at them.

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  13. Surreal and very, very funny. My computer has been in hospital, and I am so glad that its return allowed me to read this dance into weirdness. Thank you.

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  15. I don't know what goes on in your brain but please don't ever remove it. :D

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  16. This is possibly the oddest thing I've read in quite a while. Awesome!

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